Supply Chain Leadership

Supply Chain Leadership

DSJ Global: Your Leading Partner for Supply Chain Leadership Talent

DSJ Global is a leading talent partner delivering mid-senior end-to-end supply chain talent. We help secure business-critical professionals through permanent, contract, and multi-hire recruitment in Supply Chain Leadership.

Guided by our values, DSJ Global delivers a streamlined service that we can be proud of. From uniting talented professionals with industry-leading companies across the globe to investing in world-class technology for consistent, exceptional service, we deliver the talent that customers want, when they want it.

Whether you're looking to secure the right Supply Chain Leadership professional for your business or become the next candidate to settle into a new role, DSJ Global delivers a high-quality, trusted service that provides a competitive advantage for sourcing talent.

If you're a Supply Chain Leadership professional looking for new career opportunities, please register your CV/resume.

Register your CV
or
Search for a job

If you're a client looking for the best Supply Chain Leadership talent, please register your vacancy or request a call back.

Register your vacancy
or
Request a call back

Benefits of working with DSJ Global’s Leadership team

We are a trusted talent partner. When working with DSJ Global’s Leadership team, you can expect to receive:

15 years of experience and professional knowledge in the Supply Chain Leadership industry

Access to an exclusive global network of clients and active and passive Supply Chain Leadership candidates

Guidance and advice from our global award-winning talent experts in the Supply Chain Leadership sector

​Embark on your talent journey by engaging our expert consultants. Complete our form, and let us share how DSJ Global can effectively collaborate with your organization to fulfill your unique recruitment needs.

Looking to hire? Request a call back

Supply Chain Leadership Jobs

The future of Supply Chain Leadership roles is bright. Showcase your skills and expertise by submitting your CV/resume with us or by starting your job search here. We connect talented professionals with exciting career opportunities in this dynamic field. Join us today!

Director of Supply Chain

Qualifications * Leadership experience 5+ years * 6+ years procurement experience in a manufacturing/industrials environment * Sourcing, contracting, and negotiation skills * Strong communication, works well with cross-functional teams Responsibilities * Establish and execute Supply Chain strategy and processes * Indirect Sourcing/Purchasing * Build out supply chain team * Manage supplier performance and relationships Job description Title: Director of Supply Chain Company Overview: Our client, an innovative and vertically integrated mining organization is looking for a Director of Supply Chain to establish a Supply Chain strategy to keep up with the demand of the growing business. Qualifications: * Leadership experience 5+ years * 6+ years procurement experience in a manufacturing/industrials environment * Undergraduate degree requirement, Supply Chain or Engineering background preferred * Sourcing, contracting, and negotiation skills * Strong communication, works well with cross-functional teams Responsibilities: * Establish and execute Supply Chain strategy and processes * Indirect Sourcing/Purchasing * Build out supply chain team * Manage supplier performance and relationships

Negotiable
United States of America
Apply

Global Supply Chain Manager

We are currently working with a pharmaceutical manufacturing company in Brussels, Belgium that are seeking a Supply Chain Manager to join their team. In this role, you will be responsible for overseeing the planning and procurement of finished goods from our client's facilities and third-party suppliers. Additionally, you will be tasked with maintaining optimal supply levels for all of our client's warehouses and direct-to-consumer customers, ensuring a seamless supply chain experience for consumers, retailers, wholesalers, and distributors. Key responsibilities: Developing and implementing supply planning processes for critical supply channels. Strategically planning and executing production activities to align with identified demand, lead times, and capacity constraints, ensuring a continuous supply flow without interruptions. Regularly reviewing and assessing forecast accuracy in comparison to actual stock levels, expiry dates, and capacity limitations. Assisting in long-range capacity analysis to support efficient planning and operations. Sharing responsibility for maintaining consistent customer service levels by actively engaging in supply chain management. Identifying opportunities for process enhancements and implementing improvements to optimize the planning process. Overall management of the supply department. Requirements: To be considered for this role, candidates should meet the following qualifications: A minimum of 5 years of experience in a similar role, preferably in Pharma or FMCG industries. Possess strong analytical skills, demonstrating an ability to make data-driven decisions. Proven ability to multitask efficiently in a dynamic environment. Familiarity with ERP systems. Exceptional written and verbal communication skills, along with strong relationship-building capabilities.

Negotiable
Brussels
Apply

Supply Chain Manager

A leading CPG organization is looking to add a Supply Chain Manager to their growing team! You will be responsible for leading and developing end to end Supply Chain processes. This is a pivotal position, allowing you to work cross-functionally and aid in the success and growth plans of the company. The role will be Hybrid based out of Tampa, FL. Key Responsibilities: Develop and lead a Supply Chain processes Oversee all procurement and inventory management processes Negotiate key contracts with Suppliers Set Strategies to enhance Procurement and Planning processes Develop/Drive KPIs to create a transparent and competitively advantaged supply chain Engage in cross-functional projects, providing exceptional Project Management insight Actively seek supply chain optimization opportunities & cost savings Lead plans to drive continuous improvement Qualifications: Bachelor's in Business Administration, Supply Chain Management, or similar field required, MBA preferred 4+ years Supply Chain Experience Excellent ERP, SAP, Microsoft Office experience required Ability to work Cross-Functionally Strong background and knowledge of supply chain processes

Negotiable
Tampa
Apply

Senior Manager Strategic Sourcing

One of the nation's leading food and beverage organizations is currently seeking a Senior Manager Strategic Sourcing to aid in the success of their growing team. This individual will have a focus most heavily on procurement processes for ingredients and food and beverage categories. This role is a pivotal and strategic position with exceptional growth opportunity within the organization. Key Responsibilities: Manage Procurement Processes for Ingredients and Food and Beverage Categories Research and negotiate vendor agreements and contracts Establish and manage key supplier relations and supplier negotiations Review suppliers and KPI development Work cross-functionally with other departments and executives within the company to execute short and long-term objectives Key Qualifications: Bachelor's Degree in Business Administration, Supply Chain, or related field 5+ years Strategic Sourcing experience Proven experience sourcing Food and Beverage Categories Food and Beverage Industry experience Required Proven supplier relationship experience Proven cross-functional experience The ability to network effectively in the industry

Negotiable
Atlanta
Apply

Director Of Supply Chain

A leading Automotive organization is looking to add a Director of Supply Chain to their growing team! You will be responsible for oversight of Procurement, Manufacturing, Warehousing, 3PL, and E2E Supply Chain processes. This is a pivotal position, allowing you to work cross-functionally and aid in the success and growth plans of the company. Key Responsibilities: Develop and lead a Supply Chain team Oversee all logistics, procurement and co-manufacturing processes Negotiate key contracts with both Domestic and International Suppliers Set Strategies to enhance Procurement and Planning processes Develop/Drive KPIs to create a transparent and competitively advantaged supply chain Engage in cross-functional projects, providing exceptional Project Management insight Actively seek supply chain optimization opportunities & cost savings Lead plans to drive continuous improvement Qualifications: Bachelor's in Business Administration, Supply Chain Management, or similar field required, MBA preferred 10+ years experience in Supply Chain Excellent NetSuite, ERP, SAP, Microsoft Office experience required Oversight of Manufacturing/Co-Manufacturing, Warehousing and Plant Experience required Ability to work Cross-Functionally Proven ability to lead a team Strong background and knowledge of supply chain processes

Negotiable
Miami
Apply

Director of Supply Chain

Director of Supply Chain This extremely fast growing Aerospace company is looking for a skilled Director of Supply Chain to join the team and hit the ground running within their production facilities. Having autonomy to lead and execute supply chain strategy in a fast paced environment, you'll be able to grow your career and conduct strategic initiatives across the companies supply chain. Some particulars on the role: Qualifications & Experience: Must have end to end supply chain management experience within a heavy machinery manufacturing environment Must have aerospace/ heavy machinery manufacturing experience High level functionality within leadership and strategy Benefits & Perks: EXTREME growth potential Competitive salary and bonus structure Benefits included If the above sounds like an exciting next step in your career, apply above!

Negotiable
Tampa
Apply

Director of Supply Chain

Director of Supply Chain This extremely fast growing Aerospace company is looking for a skilled Director of Supply Chain to join the team and hit the ground running within their production facilities. Having autonomy to lead and execute supply chain strategy in a fast paced environment, you'll be able to grow your career and conduct strategic initiatives across the companies supply chain. Some particulars on the role: Qualifications & Experience: Must have end to end supply chain management experience within a heavy machinery manufacturing environment Must have aerospace/ heavy machinery manufacturing experience High level functionality within leadership and strategy Benefits & Perks: EXTREME growth potential Competitive salary and bonus structure Benefits included If the above sounds like an exciting next step in your career, apply above!

Negotiable
Tampa
Apply

Procurement Director

One of the leading companies in the food and beverage industry is searching for a Director of Procurement to lead the Company's procurement efforts by leveraging expertise in the field to develop and implement strategic sourcing methodologies. The Director is responsible for managing procurement procedures and policies, as well as sourcing and administration needs for the acquisition of products and services. The role is crucial in aligning procurement with the company's vision and values, driving vendor selection, and fostering strategic supplier relationships. Key Responsibilities: Create and execute company-wide sourcing strategies in alignment with the company's vision and values. Ensure vendor selection enhances product quality, service, and delivery while optimizing total cost of ownership. Spearhead competitive RFx development and execution processes. Oversee supplier programs to drive cost savings, process enhancements, and risk mitigation. Utilize data analysis to evaluate procurement expenditure and supplier performance, offering data-informed suggestions. Mentor and foster the growth of category managers while nurturing supplier relationships. Qualifications: A minimum of 10 years of progressively responsible procurement, supply chain, and sourcing experience, with a track record of leadership. Bachelor's degree in Finance, Economics, or a related field. Exceptional skills in managing organizational change. Strong teamwork, adaptability, and meticulous attention to detail. Outstanding interpersonal and communication abilities. Proficiency in advanced analytics, industry benchmarking, and e-sourcing tools. If you are interested in the Procurement Director role, don't wait to apply.

Negotiable
Tampa
Apply

Director of Procurement

One of the leading companies in the food and beverage industry is searching for a Director of Procurement to lead the Company's procurement efforts. The Director is responsible for managing procurement procedures and policies, as well as sourcing and administration needs for the acquisition of products and services. The role is crucial in aligning procurement with the company's vision and values, driving vendor selection, and fostering strategic supplier relationships. This role is being offered as fully remote out of Atlanta, GA. Key Responsibilities: Create and execute company-wide sourcing strategies in alignment with the company's vision and values. Ensure vendor selection enhances product quality, service, and delivery while optimizing total cost of ownership. Spearhead competitive RFx development and execution processes. Oversee supplier programs to drive cost savings, process enhancements, and risk mitigation. Utilize data analysis to evaluate procurement expenditure and supplier performance, offering data-informed suggestions. Mentor and foster the growth of category managers while nurturing supplier relationships. Requirements: A minimum of 10 years of progressively responsible procurement, supply chain, and sourcing experience, with a track record of leadership. Bachelor's degree in Finance, Economics, or a related field. Exceptional skills in managing organizational change. Strong teamwork, adaptability, and meticulous attention to detail. Outstanding interpersonal and communication abilities. Proficiency in advanced analytics, industry benchmarking, and e-sourcing tools. If you are interested in the Procurement Director role, don't wait to apply. Contact me at 813-771-7196 or

Negotiable
Atlanta
Apply

Director of Procurement

One of the leading companies in the food and beverage industry is searching for a Director of Procurement to lead the Company's procurement efforts. The Director is responsible for managing procurement procedures and policies, as well as sourcing and administration needs for the acquisition of products and services. The role is crucial in aligning procurement with the company's vision and values, driving vendor selection, and fostering strategic supplier relationships. This role is being offered as fully remote out of Atlanta, GA. Key Responsibilities: Create and execute company-wide sourcing strategies in alignment with the company's vision and values. Ensure vendor selection enhances product quality, service, and delivery while optimizing total cost of ownership. Spearhead competitive RFx development and execution processes. Oversee supplier programs to drive cost savings, process enhancements, and risk mitigation. Utilize data analysis to evaluate procurement expenditure and supplier performance, offering data-informed suggestions. Mentor and foster the growth of category managers while nurturing supplier relationships. Requirements: A minimum of 10 years of progressively responsible procurement, supply chain, and sourcing experience, with a track record of leadership. Bachelor's degree in Finance, Economics, or a related field. Exceptional skills in managing organizational change. Strong teamwork, adaptability, and meticulous attention to detail. Outstanding interpersonal and communication abilities. Proficiency in advanced analytics, industry benchmarking, and e-sourcing tools. If you are interested in the Procurement Director role, don't wait to apply. Contact me at 813-771-7196 or

Negotiable
Atlanta
Apply

Procurement Director

One of the leading companies in the food and beverage industry is searching for a Director of Procurement to lead the Company's procurement efforts by leveraging expertise in the field to develop and implement strategic sourcing methodologies. The Director is responsible for managing procurement procedures and policies, as well as sourcing and administration needs for the acquisition of products and services. The role is crucial in aligning procurement with the company's vision and values, driving vendor selection, and fostering strategic supplier relationships. Key Responsibilities: Create and execute company-wide sourcing strategies in alignment with the company's vision and values. Ensure vendor selection enhances product quality, service, and delivery while optimizing total cost of ownership. Spearhead competitive RFx development and execution processes. Oversee supplier programs to drive cost savings, process enhancements, and risk mitigation. Utilize data analysis to evaluate procurement expenditure and supplier performance, offering data-informed suggestions. Mentor and foster the growth of category managers while nurturing supplier relationships. Qualifications: A minimum of 10 years of progressively responsible procurement, supply chain, and sourcing experience, with a track record of leadership. Bachelor's degree in Finance, Economics, or a related field. Exceptional skills in managing organizational change. Strong teamwork, adaptability, and meticulous attention to detail. Outstanding interpersonal and communication abilities. Proficiency in advanced analytics, industry benchmarking, and e-sourcing tools. If you are interested in the Procurement Director role, don't wait to apply.

Negotiable
Tampa
Apply

Supply Chain Director

A leading Retail organization is looking to add a Supply Chain Director to their growing team! You will be responsible for leading and developing a supply chain team, while overseeing Procurement and E2E Supply Chain processes. This is a pivotal position, allowing you to work cross-functionally and aid in the success and growth plans of the company. This role is being offered as fully remote out of Florida. Key Responsibilities: Develop and lead a Supply Chain team Oversee all procurement and inventory management processes Negotiate key contracts with both Domestic and International Suppliers Set Strategies to enhance Procurement and Planning processes Develop/Drive KPIs to create a transparent and competitively advantaged supply chain Engage in cross-functional projects, providing exceptional Project Management insight Actively seek supply chain optimization opportunities & cost savings Lead plans to drive continuous improvement Qualifications: Bachelor's in Business Administration, Supply Chain Management, or similar field required, MBA preferred 8+ years Supply Chain Experience Excellent ERP, SAP, Microsoft Office experience required CPG/Retail Industry experience preferred Ability to work Cross-Functionally Proven ability to lead a team Strong background and knowledge of supply chain processes

Negotiable
Florida
Apply

Supply Chain Leadership News & Insights

Flexible working is key to attract and retain talent despite challenges, say DSJ Global experts  Image
Supply-Chain

Flexible working is key to attract and retain talent despite challenges, say DSJ Global experts

​While flexible working has become increasingly popular in recent years, more companies are considering whether they should introduce or continue to allow their employees to work outside of traditional office hours and locations. Can the future be flexible in the supply chain industry, and do organizations need to offer it to attract and retain the best talent? The supply chain industry has traditionally been reliant on on-site work, making the implementation of flexible working a unique challenge. However, with the increasing demand for work-life balance and the rise of remote work, industry leaders must find ways to remain competitive in the hiring landscape while balancing the opportunities and challenges of flexible working with their business requirements and objectives. To shed light on this topic, we spoke with some of the talent experts at DSJ Global.Workplace ProductivityFlexible working can increase productivity and loyalty by helping employees feel more in control of their lives and offering a better work-life balance, which in turn can lead to higher levels of motivation and engagement– but better productivity isn’t guaranteed.As part of DSJ Global’s report, ‘The Impact of Flexible Working’, we surveyed top business leaders in the supply chain industry to find out how their company has been impacted by the rise of flexible working. Of the 63% of clients surveyed currently offering flexible working, 44% of supply chain execs have seen an increase in productivity, and 40% have seen no change.We asked Ross Williams, Senior Vice President at DSJ Global, if this is in line with his experience helping clients hire industry professionals in the US market: “I am not surprised that less than half of leaders have seen an increase in productivity. One theory on improving productivity is that it can come from inspiring employees, and we all know that it can be harder to get humans fired up and motivated to deliver more output and strive for better quality work or tighter deadlines from behind a screen.”Company CultureOne of the biggest challenges of flexible working is managing company culture, as when employees are working remotely it can be difficult to ensure that everyone is working towards the same goals. This could lead to misunderstandings and missed deadlines, negatively impacting company culture.DSJ Global’s survey found an equal split when it comes to flexible working affecting company culture, with 37% each experiencing a positive or negative impact, and the remaining 26% unchanged. Ross provides some further insights: “If candidates are offered a job that is fully remote, it is very easy for them to make the decision to accept as it can avoid them relocating their family and, for example, forcing their children to change school or their spouse to resign from their job.“However, some 100% remote companies can find it challenging to drive company culture without face-to-face communication and regular team nights out and office perks. The clients I work with that offer a hybrid work schedule find it easier to manage and steer their company values.”Attracting, Hiring and Retaining Top TalentFlexible working can also help companies to attract and retain top talent in today’s competitive job market, with many professionals looking for companies that offer flexible working arrangements.The biggest hiring challenge according to DSJ Global’s clients is a shortage of qualified candidates (37%), followed by increasing competition for top talent (20%). 10% find it is a struggle to retain talent. Emily Prendergast, Executive Director at DSJ Global, offers her experience with how businesses can improve their hiring and retention based on candidate attitudes towards flexible working:“We are currently in a candidate driven market. 2021 - 2022 experienced the ‘Great Resignation’, where many candidates took new jobs and caused a candidate shortage. This means that skilled candidates who are now in the market are being courted by multiple companies, so anyone hiring needs to make sure they are putting their best offer forward.“Counteroffers have also increased in an effort to retain existing talent, however companies need to dive deeper into why they are interviewing in the first place. It is no longer enough to just increase someone’s base salary in hopes of them staying – being more flexible with hours, listening to feedback, and increasing responsibilities are just some of the things professionals are more interested in fixing with their current employers - not just compensation.”Final considerations for businesses considering flexible workingRemote and hybrid options play a central role in both hiring decisions and company culture. The number of days people are expected to be in the office affects the success of a company's hiring strategy and helps retain existing talent, as 67% of survey respondents agree. However, for 16% of supply chain leaders it comes at the expense of productivity, and in 37% of cases it has a negative impact on office culture. We asked Ross for his key takeaways for clients asking whether to offer flexible working:“I would advise any organization considering setting up flexible working to understand the reasons why – is it to attract talent, retain talent or both? You can then determine your business needs and manage the risks by speaking to managers or leaders who have concerns about the negative impacts of flexible working, and determine what your staff want in a flexible working schedule through meetings or by sending out staff surveys.”Learn moreThe future of flexible working in the supply chain industry is explored further in DSJ Global’s report, ‘The Impact of Flexible Working’, where we surveyed business leaders to provide you with insights on how productivity and company culture has been impacted by the increasing prevalence of flexible working, the benefits and challenges it has brought to business leaders, and how companies plan to use flexible working to attract and retain top talent.Click here to download ‘The Impact of Flexible Working’ report.If you would like to talk to us about your current talent needs, fill in our form and one of our consultants will call you back.​​

Read More
Interview & Hiring Guidance Image
Supply-Chain

Interview & Hiring Guidance

​5 essential tips for employers, hiring managers, and HR on the hiring process across the end-to-end supply chainThe interview process, from initial phone call screenings and psychometric testing, to face to face interviews with the hiring manager and onsite tours, can often be a long and laborious process. So it is imperative to keep an interview process streamlined and engaged, to ensure talent doesn’t drop out, and your organization, and yourself is represented best. Here are 5 vital top tips for employers to stick to when interviewing top talent. Be present Showing excitement to prospective candidates provides insights for them into the potential team culture and attitude. Asking them questions about themselves, on their interests, their lives, their careers, as opposed to only technical questions to vet their hard skills, goes a long way in connecting on a human level. Another way to connect is by sharing real life examples of the day to day, positive experiences about the role and team, and details about project work. These are important talking points candidates like to know, and while they understand an interview may be rigorous technically, maintaining the conversational, human aspect is important too. Being engaged may sound simple, but given how much of the interview process is over Zoom/VC/phone these days, it is easy to get distracted and check emails or open windows on your computer. Remaining attentive and interested will bring the best out of the interview process and provide a positive candidate experience. Also important is to be interesting yourself. Be in sell modeMany of the above points are indirect examples of selling your team and role. However, in a more overt way, providing exciting opportunities at present and for future career growth are always on candidates’ minds and knowing there is more to be excited about than just hands-on skills or what is in the job description on day one makes them buy into the role and organization more. As part of selling the role, explain why you took this position, and what you liked about the company and team. Be relatable to their circumstances and share with them why the position in your team, at your company, is the best move they can make.Another important aspect to highlight here is the culture. Maybe there is more to what makes the role great than just the daily tasks or responsibilities, such as company sports team, lunch clubs, charitable groups, or environmental initiatives. Highlight what else is enjoyable so that candidates are excited about this role, as well as the team and company, aside from the day to day. These days competition for top talent is so tight, that those cultural differences can distinguish you amongst the rest.Be positive Many of the above points translate to this aspect of hiring, but above all, being cordial, professional, and sharing timely feedback all contribute to a positive candidate experience. In some cases, the candidate may not be a good fit culturally, or for your position, but you should still offer them professionalism and positivity in the interview. Remember, they may have colleagues or a network of other experts that could be better suited for your role/team. You want them to have a positive experience to refer people to you, and maintain your company’s reputation in the market, as well as your own. It's also important to note that many candidates often have other processes in the mix, so if you give them any chances to doubt their experience, they could be more likely to go elsewhere. Be flexible If a professional isn’t the 100% right fit, still ask yourself if there is a place for them in the team or organization, especially if they bring something unique to the company. Keep an open mind when recruiting talent, and consider the future headcount. Potentially you can create a new role for an exceptional candidate, especially if you don’t want to lose someone good to a competitor. See the positives in a candidate’s skillset if they bring enough to the table, and find reasons to say yes, especially in this market. Outside of being flexible with the job description, can you also be flexible with the offer? Offering nuanced benefits, flexible working, and customizing offers to the individual joining can again make the difference between rejecting and accepting. Be decisive The market is still exceptionally hot, so it is vital hiring managers are mindful of how quick an interview process needs to be. “Keeping someone warm” is so important, but if you can’t commit to them you do risk them going in another direction. Therefore, be timely with your feedback, especially if it's positive, to keep the momentum up. If they are at the top of your mind, you should stay at the top of theirs. Try and push approvals quickly as well. This is often bureaucratic but affect whatever influence you can have on an interview or hiring process, and don’t allow things to slow down if you can control it.Finally, be competitive. Don’t allow back and forth negotiations to hinder a process or allow time for other processes to catch up. Put your best, most competitive offer forward so it entices them from the very start.  To hire the best candidate for your open role, get in touch with DSJ Global today. As a specialist talent partner across the end-to-end supply chain, we have access to industry-leading talent around the world. Find the talent you need by submitting your vacancy, or request a call back below to elevate your hiring process with the right talent partner today.

Read More
The Impact of Flexible Working Image
Supply-Chain

The Impact of Flexible Working

​Assessing the adoption of flexible working in the supply chain industrySince its introduction to the masses, flexible working has revolutionized the world of employment. As the demand for supply chain professionals continues to grow worldwide, strategies to facilitate flexible and remote working have become essential in attracting and retaining top-tier talent.For many, some degree of flexibility is essential to achieving a healthy work-life balance. This can in turn, result in a happier and more productive workforce, which benefits businesses. However, moving processes away from the office can also have a negative impact on company culture, as teams interact less, decreasing productivity. The ambiguity of the situation made us wonder: What is the real impact of flexible working? To answer this question, here at DSJ Global we engaged with top businesses to understand their flexible working strategy. Exploring the state of flexible working across the supply chain, we take a look at the following: How productivity and company culture has been impacted by hybrid and flexible working patterns What leaders see as the benefits and the challenges to flexible workingHow companies plan to use flexible working to attract and retain top talentOffering valuable insights to professionals seeking to understand the state of flexible working in supply chain, and for organizations reflecting on their flexible and working from home policies, both can take away a number of key considerations from this exclusive report. Download your copy of the report by completing the form below:​

Read More
How the head of DSJ Global Berlin supports diversity in the supply chain industry Image
Supply-Chain

How the head of DSJ Global Berlin supports diversity in the supply chain industry

When Phaidon International approached Yacine Fall in 2019, the Berlin office had only just opened. It offered tremendous potential for growth, which Yacine saw and seized. Originally from the south of Germany and a passionate dancer to this day, Yacine had moved to Berlin to study sports and economics. Upon graduation, she wanted a career that empowered her to decide for herself where to go and how to progress. At DSJ Global, she entered the world of end-to-end Supply Chain and has advanced to brand head for DSJ Global in Berlin in just four years. We spoke to Yacine about the importance of International Women’s Day, how she encourages diversity both within her team and at the companies she consults, what advice she would give her younger self, and more. What are you proudest of in your career?“There have been quite a lot of things I’m super proud of, including the progress I’ve made as a person. My team at DSJ Global broke a very long-standing record in January, and it was one of the goals I’d set myself when I became head of DSJ Global in Berlin. I’m very proud that we achieved this as a team, that everyone contributed to a collective effort. It was not a one-man or one-woman show."I’m also proud of the growth I’ve seen and supported. We are now twelve people in the Berlin office. When I started in 2019, we were three. For this year, my goal is to guide several team members into their first management role, which will allow us to grow even further.”Why do you think it’s important to celebrate International Women’s Day, especially in the workplace?“I think it’s important to celebrate International Women’s Day to highlight it and create awareness around it. But I think it’s even more important to make it an actual effort and to center a mission of change. Of course, that’s not something that is done within one day. Rather, every day must be part of the DNA of a business and must be driven forward – not only by women but as a collective effort to change something. "I’m very happy that I found my way into a company that is making an honest effort in changing things. I’m part of an office where we have a very diverse leadership team and very proud of all the other women who are coming into managing roles and actually dominating the management table by numbers. Let’s see what the next year brings!”How do you encourage gender diversity internally in your brand? “For me, it’s not only about gender diversity. In my team, we have quite a good balance between male and female. Diversity also means that you have people of the LGBTQ+ community, people of different races, people of different ages, different nationalities, different languages. That’s what we’re trying to embody in our brand. "To achieve it, we make our hiring as transparent as possible. That involves asking the same questions to everyone to prevent a biased interview process, as well as speaking to as many people as possible. We try to get to know the candidates on an individual level even if they don’t seem like the perfect fit on paper. That’s what I base my own hiring on. "So far, my efforts reflect in the team. Of course, that’s not something you can simply check off a list. There’s always room for improvement. Therefore, we’re working closely with our Talent Acquisition Team to make sure they know the kind of people we’re looking for. That’s very important to me and the DSJ Global hiring strategy.”How do you encourage gender diversity in your sector?“As partners for the companies we’re working with, we engage with them on eye-level and truly consult them."Within end-to-end Supply Chain, especially when you look towards the automotive industry, it’s very male dominated. We make an active effort to highlight female talent or candidates from minority groups to make sure they are actually seen and represented in front of our clients. "It’s an active effort on our part to provide a diverse shortlist. Sometimes, when we find an outstanding female professional looking for a new opportunity, we also contact companies to introduce this candidate. "Of course, female talent has always been a topic, but compared to when I first started, far more companies are telling us directly they expect a certain quota of female candidates in the shortlists we provide. To me, that shows that they’re actually trying to make an effort and address a lack of diversity in their company. Especially bigger companies now have more guidelines in place to avoid discrimination. "But it’s still a long way to go for end-to-end Supply Chain. The roles that we work on at DSJ Global are at a certain seniority level and we can only work with the professionals who are already there. In the future, I think we will see more female talent since a lot of company programs are targeting diverse candidates early on in their careers. You can tell that awareness is increasing year by year, which is a very good thing to see.”What advice would you give your younger self?“The advice I would give to myself in the early stages of my professional career is that you don’t have to apologize for being loud or speaking your mind. Especially now as a female leader, I have far more confidence in myself and in the things I’m saying. I realised that when I first started in the corporate world, I always tried to blend in. I would tell my younger self to not dim your light just to not blind other people. Be there, be vocal, speak your mind. Then you’re going to find your place.”What advice would you give other women and women of color in the professional world? “Especially for women of color, when you’re raised in a very white environment, we usually fall into the trap that you always feel like the eyes are on you and that you draw a lot of attention by the way that you look. Oftentimes, we want to be everybody’s darling and become a people pleaser to not step on anyone’s toes. "But to actually change the way things work in the world, you need to step on people’s toes and have uncomfortable conversations. To gain the strength to do that, it’s very important to find your allies within a company quite quickly, for example, find your sponsors and mentors. Surround yourself with them, speak to them, use them and then it’s going to be far easier to gain the confidence to have these uncomfortable conversations and step on other people’s toes a little bit.”For more interviews with the inspiring women at Phaidon International, please visit our hub here.

Read More
Finding a company culture that fits Image
Supply-Chain

Finding a company culture that fits

For professionals seeking a new job, it’s often factors like salary, the day-to-day of the role itself, and the company brand that are central to the decision process. But each company has its own culture, customs, and values, even if they aren’t clearly defined, and they actually have more of an influence on your productivity, success, and even earnings than might be immediately clear.The world of work has undergone some remarkable transformation over the last few years, accelerated by the pandemic and the redefining of our values that it sparked - not to mention the major shift to a candidate-driven job market. As a result, experts have been given the opportunity to rethink what’s important to them in their day-to-day work life beyond the paycheck or job spec, and in large professional sectors in particular, such as technology and finance, this has positively influenced hiring companies’ approach to culture and its pivotal role in attracting and retaining top talent, as well as quality of work. A company’s culture is essentially its personality, and while some may think of it as a buzzword that signifies lunch time yoga or wearing casual clothes to work, it plays a much greater role in how an employee shows up for work every day than any promotion, bonus, or salary could. Thankfully, businesses are catching on, and companies from trendy new start-ups to corporate powerhouses are adapting to the changing needs of professionals, investing more intentionally in developing cultures focused on collaboration, positivity, and flexibility, alongside added perks that are both useful and unusual, giving them an extra competitive edge. Business cultures are just as varied as those in societies, and there can be danger in taking a job in a company where there is a cultural disconnect between employer and employee. This can lead to issues down the line as the employee becomes unhappy and the employer is dissatisfied with attitude or performance. When interviewing for a new role, it is therefore imperative that you are conducting your own assessment of their culture and how you would fit into it. It’s one thing to ask broadly about what their culture is like, but it’s important to come prepared with more specific questions in order to get a deeper sense of what life as an employee there would really be like. This article will look at what to focus on when assessing the culture of a workplace you are interviewing for, and how to get a realistic impression of the culture by doing some digging yourself before accepting a job offer. Look beyond the free gym passWhen reading about a potential role at a new company, it’s important to look beyond the shiny, eye-catching perks that they’ll want to tell you all about. While a free gym pass, pizza Fridays, a pool table, and fabulous social events are alluring, (and rightfully so, as they are a sign of a company that wants to reward the hard work of its employees) these are surface level, and your experience in the company will depend much more on deeper cultural traits and values such as flexibility when you need it, a supportive team environment, recognition, and opportunities for growth. While some perks are inventive and exciting and can certainly enhance your experience, a cool office space will never compensate for a negative work environment, and your happiness is always more important than a brand name on your CV or a bottle of beer on a Friday. Remember that perks are part of company culture, but not the culture itself, and it is a company culture that helps businesses pull through times when money for perks isn’t on tap.What is truly important to you?You can work in a beautiful office with tastefully exposed brickwork and a designer chair, but none of this will matter if you hate your job. Approaching your job search having previously assessed what exactly you are seeking from your work life, what your non-negotiables are, and which elements of company culture will have the biggest impact on you, will help you to stay focused and land the role that’s right for you. Work out what truly motivates you and will support you to be the best version of yourself both professionally and personally, whether it’s flexible working options, a diverse workforce, or a tight-knit team, and see if this is provided by the company you are interviewing for. Consider which environments make you feel productive. How do you best work? Are you seeking more autonomy and the option to work from home? Then you may not be a fit for a company that is heavily focused on collaboration and team socialising.What is the company’s mission? Its values? Does it have a corporate social responsibility programme? A diverse workforce? Pinpoint those core values and see how they align with the messages companies are including on their employee value proposition and materials for professionals. These will inspire commitment and confidence in both your search and in the decision you land on.How to research a company culture as a professionalJust as you’ll want to get a feel for a neighbourhood before you buy a house, the same applies when you are searching for a new job. Your actual exposure to a company can be limited within the recruitment process, so we recommend using the following to research a company’s culture.Do some digging onlineHave a look at employee review sites such as Glassdoor for comments from inside the company on their culture. However, keep in mind that people are potentially more likely to leave a bad review than a good one. This may mean, however, that a company with a slew of great reviews could be a particularly positive sign.See if you have any connections within the company on LinkedIn and get the inside scoop from them. Again, don’t take these viewpoints as gospel, but rather as a building block and a way to get a general idea of employee experience. LinkedIn is also a way to find out the general tenure of people who work there as well as possibilities for progression and development. Good retention and development can be a sign of a positive company culture. Branch out during your interviewWhile an interview is a company’s chance to determine whether your skills and experience are right for the role, a large part of the decision will come down to character fit, which is essentially another way of determining how you would fit into their culture. It’s also a two-way street, of course, meaning it’s your opportunity to figure out if their culture is a fit for you, too. A great way to get the answers to this question that you need is to find an opportunity to speak candidly to your interviewer or others you meet within the business. These are likely the people you’ll be interacting with regularly and you’ll want to get a sense of how they communicate, both to you and to each other. Are they excited about the company? Do they seem to get along well? Do you have things in common beyond the professional? These are all factors that contribute to the overall culture and will impact your everyday experience.Be specificAsking a generic question will give you a generic answer, and hiring managers and other people who may be part of your interview process don’t want to hear the same old question interview after interview. Instead, show the company you’re interviewing for that you’re looking for more than to just show up, do the work, and get paid. You’re an individual with more to offer, and all parties will benefit from a good cultural fit. In addition, it’s not enough for you to take their word that they have a great company culture. Get into specifics and request examples of when company values and culture have led to success or excellent employee wellbeing. For example, say that you want to work somewhere where personal development is taken seriously, and then ask for an example where a personal development program has helped an employee achieve a promotion or a new qualification. Or if mental health support is important to you, ask about the ways in which the company offers this and whether it’s been well utilised. These stories and examples will give you a much better impression of how the culture works rather than memorised lines about remote working policies and employee engagement. And on top of that, you’ll get a much better feel for the people behind the job titles, which is half the battle when it comes to understanding where you fit into a company’s culture. No matter what position you find yourself in, use these tips to spot the work cultures that will — and will not — work for you. The company you ultimately choose should enable you to flourish rather than wear you (or your well-being) out.

Read More
Energy crisis along the value chain –    Four companies on the road to sustainability  Image
Supply-Chain

Energy crisis along the value chain – Four companies on the road to sustainability

​DSJ Global discovered how four companies are saving energy and reducing emissionsRising prices, persistent inflation – what affects private households burdens the supply chain industry to an even greater extent. While energy-saving measures used to be simply related to a company's own Health, Safety, Environment (HSE) and sustainability strategy to reduce its carbon footprint, they are now part of essential processes that could secure long-term cost savings and eco-optimize a company’s future.But what can be done along the supply chain to keep control over rising energy costs? How can firms reduce their carbon footprint to both cut emissions and minimize consumption? Yumiko Moehlmann, Head of Quality & HSE at DSJ Global, asked. Reducing the carbon footprint as a business When asked, "What is your company doing to become more sustainable and save energy?" 51% of participants responded with a clear "reduce carbon footprint." 20% of companies are sourcing more sustainable raw materials for their production while 16% are switching to energy-saving solutions for lighting. 12% also said they are raising awareness among their employees through education and training. To gain further insights, Yumiko Moehlmann personally surveyed her network in the Quality and HSE area on the topic, talking to four companies along the supply chain to provide insights into how their companies are defying rising energy prices - or not. Energy targets firmly anchored in corporate cultureCOO at a global player in the e-mobility sectorThe e-mobility sector is considered a pioneer in sustainability. A global player and client of DSJ Global also pursues this mission at the level of corporate culture. They have clearly defined environmental and energy goals and woven them into their corporate strategy. "We raise awareness on the topic of energy," explains the COO. By visualizing the costs and energy consumption of equipment and production, their company create awareness among employees, who can adjust and optimize their actions and processes accordingly. There are also detailed shutdown lists to ensure that sensitive machinery is operated correctly and that all employees are taught the right procedure. This saves resources and protects the equipment. Furthermore, efforts to switch to the most modern and energy-saving machines support the company’s current measures. Although these machines have to meet certain requirements, they are much more efficient and cost-effective to operate.For example, the global player has already converted to a decentralized compressed air network with small local systems that run when they are needed. Previously, they were in continuous operation even though it wasn't necessary. ​In-house gardening as a delicious solution​Director Global EHS at a tier 1 automotive supplier​One easy-to-implement option for indirectly reducing one's own emissions is to switch to so-called green electricity, i.e. electricity from renewable sources. Electricity from solar, wind or even biogas produces less CO2 during production and is therefore considered better for the environment. Yet upon closer inspection, these promising effects might be lower in reality, according to the Director for Global EHS at a tier 1 automotive supplier. ​This long-time customer of DSJ Global has already converted many areas to green energy. However, the Director was skeptical– he saw it as clear "greenwashing." ​Greenwashing refers to the attempt by organizations to achieve a "green image" through communication, marketing and individual measures without having systematically anchored corresponding measures in the operational business. ​"Electricity is ultimately the same for everyone," says the Director. The percentage from renewable sources doesn't change the fact of how much energy is consumed, he said. Consequently, a widely advertised switch to green electricity is not effective, since ESG must be primarily about reducing the company's own emissions. ​For the Director, however, it would be more effective to switch all light sources in operation to resource-saving LEDs. ​Unfortunately, the biggest problem cannot be solved so easily: According to lifecycle analyses that the automotive supplier initiated for each product, their supply chain leaves the largest carbon footprint.  ​They found that commuting had a particularly heavy impact as well. After two years of pandemic home office regulations, more and more companies are looking to return to the office to strengthen collaboration within departments and teams. ​As the Director explains, his company is currently looking for a solution to make this more sustainable. Some employees have no other choice than their car, but for others, covering the cost for public transportation or even leasing a bike is an option. In addition, smaller on-site office spaces could help reduce emissions if a location has a larger catchment area with longer commutes.​In other areas, there's room for more creativity: some locations of the automotive supplier, the director said, have established in-house gardens to more sustainably source the fresh fruits and vegetables provided to employees each day. "In the past, fruits and vegetables were delivered daily," the Director explains. "Inhouse gardening stops the supply chain and their vans, saving tons of CO2, and the company cafeterias use the homegrown fruits and vegetables instead."​The initiative has been so well received that entire teams are now getting personally involved. In the "Lunch & Learn" format, employees educate themselves via open lectures on a variety of topics while enjoying a company-funded lunch.​Global Sustainability Manager defies initial pessimism​Head of Health, Safety, Environment, Sustainability, Quality, at a global player in the chemical industry​There is less optimism at a company in the CHEMPARK network. The head of HSSEQ sees very little potential – apart from putting a stop to production – for saving energy.​Reducing commuting and the associated emissions as well as the energy required through more flexible home office solutions is only possible to a limited extent in the case of this company, he says. ​But the company does not want to give up. It has recently hired a Global Sustainability Manager and hopes for sustainable change, even if any structures have to develop before they take effect and lead to savings. ​Photovoltaics as an alternative to costly investments​Senior Manager Mineralization at a building materials manufacturer​The possibility of saving energy in cement production is a question that also occupies the senior manager for mineralization of a building materials manufacturer. In fact, the only way to do this, the senior manager says, is to stop production or shut it down – neither of which are economically viable options, of course.​Since the manufacturer buys its electricity on the stock exchange, it’s possible to obtain it more cheaply, yet that depends on the production processes. They need to be optimized to allow for a more cost-effective tariff. ​Another option is to invest in more energy-efficient plants. "Some of our equipment is 60 or 70 years old," the senior manager says. "New machines are inevitably more energy efficient, but realistically we can't replace all the machines because the cost would be far too high."​How his company nevertheless tries to counteract the enormous costs and has been reducing the overall need for externally produced energy for years. Their method of choice: photovoltaic systems on the factory roofs. This is already proving effective: The resulting savings could light up an entire small town. ​Heat recovery as the vision of the future​Senior EHS Manager at a global semiconductor company​Since they are renting in their current location, this global semiconductor company has little room to maneuver. ​"We're turning down the heat, relying on home offices and reduced hours," explains DSJ Global's client. Long-term goals are few and far between since, as a tenant, they can't seek extensive renovations. ​Still, there are innovative ideas: Since the production machines give off a lot of heat, the Senior EHS Manager and his team are working on using this to generate electricity via heat recovery.​Funding for production conversion in sight​As difficult as cost savings and emissions reductions are: A competitive, climate-friendly industry is essential for sustainable growth and the fight against climate change.  ​At the beginning of December 2022, Germany’s Economics Minister Robert Habeck announced climate protection agreements that he would conclude with industry in 2023 to stimulate necessary investments in the use of hydrogen. This is the best alternative to fossil energy sources, especially in the steel and chemical industries. Under the climate protection agreements, companies receive both subsidies and monetary support if they convert to green production.  ​When and to what extent these funds will come remains to be seen. Until then, it's up to innovative ideas like indoor gardens and company-owned photovoltaic systems to make the value chain more sustainable. ​Conclusion​Opinions on how to save energy along the value chain vary widely, Yumiko Moehlmann confirms. "Many companies don't want to or can't change anything, or position themselves better. Others invest a lot in it." ​She sees the promised climate agreements as a positive sign. After all, as some of the examples cited show, companies especially need help with the enormous costs of switching to greener production. ​Yumiko and her team of experts at DSJ Global are closely following how the energy crisis is affecting HSE and sustainability strategies and how different companies are adapting. Whether the companies that are not currently planning any changes will aim for more sustainable production in the future remains cause for speculation.​Your partner for sustainable niche professionals​In addition to HSE talents, our global network continues to grow in the area of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and Sustainability.​Reach out to our talent experts today, to discuss us supporting you with a vacancy, or as a professional keen to make their next career move. ​Submit a vacancy​Send CV​Contact​Yumiko Moehlmann​Head of Quality & HSE, DSJ Global​yumiko.moehlmann@dsjglobal.com​+49 30 726211418

Read More
Managing Millennials and the Future of Leadership Image
Supply-Chain

Managing Millennials and the Future of Leadership

​It is evident that when it comes towork, millennials are very different than the generations that came before them. In order to support and manage this type of talent, it is essential to address the generational differences, to better understand their priorities and behavior in the workplace.Millennials all have one thing in common: they want to make a difference. Research suggests that this new breed of worker is not primarily motivated by money. In a survey byVirtualiand Workplace Trends, just under half ofmillennialsidentified empowering others as their primary motivation for leadership. It is more than just a numbers game, with only 5% citing money as the reason they would pursue a leadership role.Given these difference, current leaders must consider new management styles for leading these employees, and consider how to incorporate millennial priorities into the organizational processes. Additionally, as millennials themselves begin to reach management positions, organizations must consider how these leaders, and their own management styles, will differ from the leaders who preceded them.Managing MillennialsGenerational differences mean that millennial workers need to be managed in a different way; focusing on how they perceive their role in the workplace. Many studies are promoting the idea that rather than a traditional management structure, millennials prefer to be ‘led’, rather than ‘managed’. This shift is promoting new and emerging attitudes when it comes to the nature of leadership. It is down, in part, to the fact that millennials don’t see work in the traditional sense. Rather, millennials see the workplace as a hub of innovation and a place to be social – and now the workplace and leadership need to adapt to meet these expectations. Collaboration is key when it comes to millennials as they value relationships and teamwork, rather than individual contribution.In the modernworkplacethe line between the personal and the professional is beginning to blur, and it’s important to make adjustments accordingly. Work is part of the identity of the millennial generation; andthis needs to be accounted for in the way they are managed.The priorities of millennials are different to those of previous generations in several key ways.AdvancementMillennials see promotional and advancement as a central factor in theworkplace,and value these opportunities within a company. It is one of the key motivators they consider when choosing a company to join. Managers need to focus not just on how these employees can help the business, but how the organization can support them into the next stages of their professional growth. New experiences are of the utmost importance to millennials; tactics such as putting themonrotation to experience and learn about different areas of the business can help them feel they are continually growing.It is imperative to understand that these employees have an expectation that performance leads to faster advancement. To keep them satisfied with their positions, companies need to create a strong correlation between performance and promotions. One strategy to consider is adding additional grades and position levels to make quick and more frequent promotions feasible from a business perspective.It is not just about their own advancement but the idea that everything is progressing – task these staff with creating innovative solutions to existing processes and problems. Efficiency is a priority, and they value the ability to contribute to the wider growth and progress of the organization.Training is a valuable tool in retaining millennials, for whom continued learning and development isa mainfocus. They want to learn new skills and constantly develop themselves personally and professionally. Offering training opportunities to existing employees is a great way to maintain a focus on progression.FeedbackMillennials like to know where they stand, and how they are performing in relation to their goals. Whether it is constructive criticism about how they could perform better next time or just praise for a job well done, this group appreciatesfeedback. This could come in the form of regular one-to-one meetings or quarterly appraisals, but what matters is the continued dialogue and feedback on their work. The mentality behind this is similar to that of advancement – millennials like to feel that they are always movingforwardsand advancing, so providing continuous feedback maintains the perception of progressing towards a target, and allows for improvements or adjustments if needed.A job is not just about money for a millennial, they want to know that they are learning and growing throughout their career. Regular meetings and feedback are likely to boost performance, creating a more productive, motivated team.Diversity85% of millennial talent globally have identified diversity and inclusion as important when it comes to choosing a workplace. There is a disconnect between candidates and employers with 71% of candidates feeling that a number of employers who promote diversity are ‘ticking boxes’ rather than genuinely supporting diversity initiatives. It is vital that organizations build diversity into their employer value propositions and communicate it to potential candidates with their employer brand marketing.Businesses should take this a step further, integrating it into the foundations of the business.3 Millennials are keen to be involved in diversity initiatives and will likely participate in any projects and initiatives that foster a more inclusive work environment. For this reason, diversity is not only important for attracting millennial talent, but also retaining them and keeping them engaged with the organization.The Importance of FlexibilityOne of the most central priorities for millennial workers is flexibility This generation works well when given detailed instructions and set KPIs, but would prefer to have a more flexible working arrangement to meet their targets, rather than being micromanaged.Flexible working environments are also attractive to millennials because it helps them maintain work-life balance. Millennials value the potential to work from home or even from a coffee shop – with the emphasis on quality of work, rather than the location of where the work is performed. Millennials value the ability to see and do new things, such astravelling, so flexibility is a big motivator for this demographic, many of whom have a strong desire to work abroad as part of a role.Millennials in LeadershipMillennials are different to the Gen X-ers and baby boomers mainly in that they have grown up at a time where nearly every aspect of their lives has been infiltrated by technology. This has not only shaped their needs and wants from an employment perspective, but also it alters the management style they will have as leaders themselves.Millennials value what are considered ‘soft’ principles when it comes to leadership. These include areas such as wellbeing and employee development. Only one in ten millennials felt that effective leaders focused on the bottom line alone. Qualities such as the ability to inspire, vision, the ability to make decisions, and passion were all earmarked as vital characteristic for a strong leader.Communication skills and relationship-building are often highlighted as the most important skills, with more than half of millennials seeing these as essential (58% and 55% respectively). They also noted these as their core strengths, while industry knowledge (43%) and technical expertise (41%) were seen as less important for a leader.6The majority of millennials want to be transformational leaders who disrupt the status quo and inspire their team. The nature of leadership is evolving and the more traditional hierarchy with a leader imposing rigid control has fallen in popularity, with collaboration and innovation being the key priorities in the minds of millennial leaders.Long-Term ChangeMillennials have a different take on management, both how they prefer to be managed and the types of manager they aspire to be. The central factor lies in their inclination towards leadership, rather than traditional management. They want to be inspired both by their managers and their team around them.As they now make up such a large proportion of the workforce, it’s likely that these changes will create long-term evolution to the nature of leadership in the workplace. As the definition of leadership changes, it’s important for organizations to keep an open mind about the changing relationship between management and employees and adapt processes to these shifting priorities. Focusing on these objectives will help to attract the best talent and make a company an employer of choice for millennials.To learn more about attracting millennials to your organization and how millennials will continue to impact leadership in the workplace, get in touch today.​Sources:https://www.inc.com/jeff-haden/managing-millenials-how- to-lead-connect-and-engage-millenial-employees.htmlhttps://www.forbes.com/sites/georgebradt/2014/05/27/ trying-to-manage-millennials-give-up-and-lead-them- instead/#50afe6b725bdhttp://pwc.blogs.com/gender_agenda/2017/01/inclusive- recruitment.htmlhttp://www.pwc.com/gx/en/issues/talent/future-of-work/ managing-millennials.htmlhttp://knowledge-leader.colliers.com/dylan-taylor/how- millennials-are-redefining-leadership/http://www.cio.com/article/2956600/leadership- management/how-millennials-challenge-traditional- leadership.htmlhttp://knowledge-leader.colliers.com/dylan-taylor/how- millennials-are-redefining-leadership/--------DSJ Global is a leading specialist recruitment agency for procurement and supply chain professionals. We know that procurement and supply chain is the critical business driver in any business. We exist to take care of one of the market’s most significant challenges: talent acquisition. Today, we provide contingency, retained search and project-based contract recruitment from our global hubs in London, Berlin, Switzerland, New York and Chicago.We pride ourselves in keeping our professional network up-to-date with any changes that will shape the future of work or affect the hiring process. Visit our website to discover more invaluable insights, including exclusive research, salary guides and market trends. ​

Read More

Looking for something specific?

View more blogs